2011'10.07.Fri

FLIGHT FARE ALERTS - FARE ALERTS


FLIGHT FARE ALERTS - CHEAP FLIGHTS TO THE BAHAMAS - CHEAP AIRLINE FARES INDIA.



Flight Fare Alerts





flight fare alerts






    flight
  • (in soccer, cricket, etc.) Deliver (a ball) with well-judged trajectory and pace

  • a formation of aircraft in flight

  • shoot a bird in flight

  • Shoot (wildfowl) in flight

  • an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"





    alerts
  • (alert) engaged in or accustomed to close observation; "caught by a couple of alert cops"; "alert enough to spot the opportunity when it came"; "constantly alert and vigilant, like a sentinel on duty"

  • A period of vigilance in response to such a warning

  • (alert) alarm: warn or arouse to a sense of danger or call to a state of preparedness; "The empty house alarmed him"; "We alerted the new neighbors to the high rate of burglaries"

  • An announcement or signal warning of danger

  • (alert) condition of heightened watchfulness or preparation for action; "bombers were put on alert during the crisis"

  • The state of being watchful for possible danger





    fare
  • The money a passenger on public transportation has to pay

  • eat well

  • menu: an agenda of things to do; "they worked rapidly down the menu of reports"

  • A passenger paying to travel in a vehicle, esp. a taxicab

  • do: proceed or get along; "How is she doing in her new job?"; "How are you making out in graduate school?"; "He's come a long way"

  • A range of food, esp. of a particular type











flight fare alerts - Huggies Pull-Ups




Huggies Pull-Ups Training Pants with Cool Alert, Boys, 3T-4T, 52 Count


Huggies Pull-Ups Training Pants with Cool Alert, Boys, 3T-4T, 52 Count



PULL-UPS® Training Pants are designed to get kids interested in potty training. Stretchy sides allow kids to pull them on and off, and Disney characters for boys and girls help make training pants seem like Big Kid® underwear.

callout top with logo
HUGGIES Pull-Ups Training Pants with Cool Alert Wetness Liner, Boys, 3T-4T, 52-Count
At a Glance:
Gives a cooling feeling within seconds of getting wet to help your child learn to stay dry


Underwear-like waistband helps children learn how to pull them on and like regular underwear


Easy-open sides for quick potty check


Customized protection where boys need it most for maximum absorbency


Graphics feature Cars' Lightning McQueen to encourage potty success


callout bottom

callout box top

2T-3T: Up to 34 pounds

3T-4T: 32 to 40 pounds

4T-5T: 38+ pounds

See all HUGGIES product sizes

callout box bottom

HUGGIES Pull-Ups Training Pants with Cool Alert Wetness Liner, Boys, 3T-4T, 52-Count Product Shot
View larger.
PULL-UPS with Cool Alert
PULL-UPS Training Pants are designed to get kids interested in potty training. Stretchy sides allow kids to pull them on and off, and Disney characters for boys and girls help make training pants seem like Big Kid underwear.
Earn Rewards
Parenthood is the ride of your life. HUGGIES is here to help you celebrate it with the HUGGIES Rewards Program. Earn points for the diapers and wipes you buy using the Reward Code on the package. Redeem points for fun rewards, or enter instant win and sweepstakes for valuable prizes.
Poo. Wipe. Flush.
PULL-UPS Flushable Moist Wipes help your child finish up like a pro. Plus, they break up quickly and provide a better clean than toilet paper alone.
Other PULL-UPS Training Pants
When it comes to potty training, each child learns differently. That's why we offer several kinds of PULL-UPS training pants, each customized specifically for girls and boys.
Pull-UpsPull-UpsPull-UpsPull-UpsPull-UpsPull-UpsPull-UpsPull-UpsPull-Ups
Cool Alert
Feels cool
when wetLearning Designs
Designs fade
when wetNight*Time
Keep training
overnight Cool Alert
Feels cool
when wetLearning Designs
Designs fade
when wetNight*Time
Keep training
overnight


What's in the Box
HUGGIES Pull-Ups Training Pants with Cool Alert Wetness Liner, Boys, 3T-4T, 52-Count.

Not ready for potty training? See these HUGGIES products.
HUGGIES' products are designed for every situation--from newborns with sensitive belly buttons to toddlers ready for a decathlon to children needing a better option as they outgrow bedwetting.


New Baby (up to 10 lbs.)

Baby (up to 18 lbs.)

Active Baby (16 to 36 lbs.)

Toddlers & Children (38 to 125 lbs.)


HUGGIES Pure & Natural
Organic cotton, hypoallergenic, with aloe and vitamin AHUGGIES Pure & Natural
Organic cotton, hypoallergenic, with aloe and vitamin AHUGGIES Little Movers Regular & Jeans
Diapers shaped to fit your active babyGoodNites for Girls & Boys
Keep children dry and comfortable until they outgrow bedwetting
HUGGIES Little Snugglers
Gentle protection for your new babyHUGGIES Little Snugglers
Gentle protection for your new babyHUGGIES Little Movers Slip-Ons
Got a squirmy baby? Try a new, easy way to changePULL-UPS for Girls & Boys
Training pants with Big Kid underwear-style
HUGGIES Snug & Dry
All-around stretch for excellent leakage protectionHUGGIES Snug & Dry
All-around stretch for excellent leakage protection
HUGGIES Overnites
Maximum absorbency for dryness all night










75% (15)





Gerber daisy licks her chops...




Gerber daisy licks her chops...





To The Daisy (first poem)

"Her divine skill taught me this,
That from every thing I saw
I could some instruction draw,
And raise pleasure to the height
Through the meanest objects sight.
By the murmur of a spring,
Or the least bough's rustelling;
By a Daisy whose leaves spread
Shut when Titan goes to bed;
Or a shady bush or tree;
She could more infuse in me
Than all Nature's beauties can
In some other wiser man.'
G. Wither. * His muse.

IN youth from rock to rock I went,
From hill to hill in discontent
Of pleasure high and turbulent,
Most pleased when most uneasy;
But now my own delights I make,--
My thirst at every rill can slake,
And gladly Nature's love partake,
Of Thee, sweet Daisy!

Thee Winter in the garland wears
That thinly decks his few grey hairs;
Spring parts the clouds with softest airs,
That she may sun thee;
Whole Summer-fields are thine by right;
And Autumn, melancholy Wight!
Doth in thy crimson head delight
When rains are on thee.

In shoals and bands, a morrice train,
Thou greet'st the traveller in the lane;
Pleased at his greeting thee again;
Yet nothing daunted,
Nor grieved if thou be set at nought:
And oft alone in nooks remote
We meet thee, like a pleasant thought,
When such are wanted.

Be violets in their secret mews
The flowers the wanton Zephyrs choose;
Proud be the rose, with rains and dews
Her head impearling,
Thou liv'st with less ambitious aim,
Yet hast not gone without thy fame;
Thou art indeed by many a claim
The Poet's darling.

If to a rock from rains he fly,
Or, some bright day of April sky,
Imprisoned by hot sunshine lie
Near the green holly,
And wearily at length should fare;
He needs but look about, and there
Thou art!--a friend at hand, to scare
His melancholy.

A hundred times, by rock or bower,
Ere thus I have lain couched an hour,
Have I derived from thy sweet power
Some apprehension;
Some steady love; some brief delight;
Some memory that had taken flight;
Some chime of fancy wrong or right;
Or stray invention.

If stately passions in me burn,
And one chance look to Thee should turn,
I drink out of an humbler urn
A lowlier pleasure;
The homely sympathy that heeds
The common life, our nature breeds;
A wisdom fitted to the needs
Of hearts at leisure.

Fresh-smitten by the morning ray,
When thou art up, alert and gay,
Then, cheerful Flower! my spirits play
With kindred gladness:
And when, at dusk, by dews opprest
Thou sink'st, the image of thy rest
Hath often eased my pensive breast
Of careful sadness.

And all day long I number yet,
All seasons through, another debt,
Which I, wherever thou art met,
To thee am owing;
An instinct call it, a blind sense;
A happy, genial influence,
Coming one knows not how, nor whence,
Nor whither going.

Child of the Year! that round dost run
Thy pleasant course,--when day's begun
As ready to salute the sun
As lark or leveret,
Thy long-lost praise thou shalt regain;
Nor be less dear to future men
Than in old time;--thou not in vain
Art Nature's favourite.

William Wordsworth











To the Daisy




To the Daisy






In youth from rock to rock I went
From hill to hill, in discontent
Of pleasure high and turbulent,
Most pleas'd when most uneasy;
But now my own delights I make,
My thirst at every rill can slake,
And gladly Nature's love partake
Of thee, sweet Daisy!

When soothed a while by milder airs,
Thee Winter in the garland wears . . . . . .
That thinly shades his few grey hairs;
Spring cannot shun thee;
Whole summer fields are thine by right;
And Autumn, melancholy Wight!
Doth in thy crimson head delight
When rains are on thee.

In shoals and bands, a morrice train,
Thou greet'st the Traveller in the lane;
If welcome once thou count'st it gain;
Thou art not daunted, . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nor car'st if thou be set at naught;
And oft alone in nooks remote
We meet thee, like a pleasant thought,
When such are wanted.

Be Violets in their secret mews
The flowers the wanton Zephyrs chuse;
Proud be the Rose, with rains and dews
Her head impearling;
Thou liv'st with less ambitious aim,
Yet hast not gone without thy fame; . . . . . .
Thou art indeed by many a claim
The Poet's darling.

If to a rock from rains he fly,
Or, some bright day of April sky,
Imprison'd by hot sunshine lie
Near the green holly,
And wearily at length should fare;
He need but look about, and there
Thou art! a Friend at hand, to scare
His melancholy. . . . . . . . . . . . .

A hundred times, by rock or bower,
Ere thus I have lain couch'd an hour,
Have I derived from thy sweet power
Some apprehension;
Some steady love; some brief delight;
Some memory that had taken flight;
Some chime of fancy wrong or right;
Or stray invention.

If stately passions in me burn,
And one chance look to Thee should turn, . . . . . .

I drink out of an humbler urn
A lowlier pleasure;
The homely sympathy that heeds
The common life, our nature breeds;
A wisdom fitted to the needs
Of hearts at leisure.

When, smitten by the morning ray,
I see thee rise alert and gay,
Then, chearful Flower! my spirits play
With kindred motion: . . . . . . . . . . . .

At dusk, I've seldom mark'd thee press
The ground, as if in thankfulness,
Without some feeling, more or less,
Of true devotion.

And all day long I number yet,
All seasons through, another debt,
Which I wherever thou art met,
To thee am owing;
An instinct call it, a blind sense;
A happy, genial influence, . . . . . . . . . . . .

Coming one knows not how nor whence,
Nor whither going.

Child of the Year! that round dost run
Thy course, bold lover of the sun,
And chearful when the day's begun
As morning Leveret,
Thou long the Poet's praise shalt gain;
Thou wilt be more belov'd by men
In times to come; thou not in vain
Art Nature's Favorite. . . . . . .




-THE END-
William Wordsworth's poem: To the Daisy











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